Nicole Groman MS, RDN, CDN

Nicole Groman MS, RDN, CDN, is based in New York City. She received her Bachelor of Science in Human Development from Cornell University, and her Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition from New York University, where she also completed her dietetic internship. In her private practice, Nicole Groman Nutrition, Nicole helps you reconnect with your body. She encourages prioritizing your body over your mind, having faith that your body will tell you what it needs, what it doesn’t, when it’s had too much, or if it hasn’t had enough. She’s been quoted in Vogue, Women’s Health, and Well+Good. Check out her work and learn more here.

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73.5% of Way Members Notice Change in the First Week

Don’t Take It From Us…

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Such a refreshing health app, based around how food makes you feel rather than how food makes you look.

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Stop looking, this is the best one. I’ve done my research and I can tell you that Way is the way to be. They have been so helfpul with answering my questions and I’m finally maintaining this healthy living lifestyle I always wanted to live!

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Feel Good When You Eat, All The Time

Intuitive Eating meets Cognitive Behavioral Science and Mindfulness, making it simple to understand the thoughts, emotions, and feelings behind your relationship with food.

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An excerpt from Nicole‘s writing…

Recently, “body positivity” has gained significant attention in the media and popular culture. Body positivity is the idea that everyone, no matter their size or shape, should love their body and feel confident in themselves.

While this movement has undoubtedly helped to challenge harmful beauty standards and promote self-love, it is not without its criticisms. Some argue that body positivity can be problematic, especially when it emphasizes the need to be positive about one’s body at all times, even when that may not be realistic. Here, we’ll discuss the potential issues with body positivity and how adopting a body-neutral approach can be a more sustainable and healthy approach to our relationship with our bodies.

Body Positivity and Its Criticisms

Body positivity, at its heart, champions self-love and acceptance. It encourages moving beyond narrow beauty standards and fosters a more inclusive society. This movement has seen a surge in media and popular culture, with many celebrities endorsing body love and acceptance.

Despite its positive intentions, body positivity can be problematic in certain ways. For one, it often emphasizes the need always to be positive about one’s body, even when that may not be realistic or helpful. This can create pressure to feel good about ourselves all the time and lead to guilt or shame if we fail to live up to this ideal. Additionally, it can be exclusionary in practice, as it may not fully represent those who don’t fit certain body types deemed “worthy” of love and acceptance.

Further, focusing on “positive” feelings can lead to overemphasizing appearance-based affirmations, leading to a superficial understanding of body acceptance. This can be damaging, as it may encourage behavior based on external validation rather than true self-love and appreciation.